MATH + CODING WORKSHOP 1-2

(c) George Gadanidis, 2021

Designed to serve as a base lesson plan — a set of activities to select from and adapt — for diverse learning settings (f2f, hybrid, online, parents/children).

Although designed with the Ontario 1-8 math curriculum in mind, this workshop would be of value to all educators interested in learning how to integrate math + coding.

Based on our collection of math + coding lessons.

WORKSHOP OVERVIEW

A. WALK + STAMP

1. Hands-on

How might your students model motions, paths and patterns like the ones shown below, with physical movements, using their bodies and other physical objects, as well as with chart paper, markers and dabbers?

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This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2021-01-16-at-12.24.34-PM.png
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2021-02-16-at-12.05.00-PM.png

When patterns and underlying ideas are embodied, they provide physical and visual anchors for understanding pattern rules, as well as instructions written as code.

NOTE 1: Scratch vs Scratch Jr?
  • In the coding activities shared below, we are using Scratch rather than Scratch Jr. Why?
  • Scratch has a Pen tool, which allows motion patterns to leave a trail, as you would with a pen on paper.
  • Scratch also allows students to stamp objects (Sprites) they move.
  • These visual trails give digital/coded patterns a concrete feel. They can be pointed to and discussed.
NOTE 2: Reading ability & understanding code
  • How can students who cannot yet read well, learn to understand and use code blocks?
  • The “hands-on” activities discussed above develop anchors that help students learn the meaning of code blocks.
  • Young students love being in control, which is what coding allows them to do. They are motivated to attend deeply and to learn quickly. Coding may provide an environment where some reading skills develop incidentally.
  • It helps that Scratch code uses colour, shape and sometimes symbols, to identify its purpose.

2. Walk + stamp with code

1. Go to https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/488664188/editor/ to see the code shown below.

2. Click and Run: RESET, WALK RIGHT, WALK RIGHT, WALK RIGHT

3. Also use STAMP to create each of the patterns below.

a)

b)

c)

d)

3. Walk in different directions

4. Create the code block shown below, to move the sprite up.

5. Create each of the patterns below.

a)

b)

c)

4. Change the colour of the Sprite

6. Create a new code block (shown below) that changes the colour effect of the sprite.

7. Create the patterns below. In some cases, you may need to click/drag the Sprite to a different location on the Stage.

a)

b)

c)

8. Create your own patterns on the Stage.

5. Combine movements WITH CODE

9. Edit the code to create new possibilities. For example:

10. Copy/edit code and combine it into more complex coding blocks, to create patterns with a single click. For example:

6. WHAT DID YOU LEARN?

What did you learn so far?

How did you feel?

What else do you want to know?

B. WALK 2 PATTERNS AT ONCE

1. Hands-on

How might your students model motions, paths and patterns like the one shown below, with concurrent physical movements, using their bodies and other physical objects, as well as with chart paper, markers and dabbers?

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2021-01-16-at-3.24.19-PM.png

When patterns and underlying ideas are embodied, they provide physical and visual anchors for understanding pattern rules, as well as code.

2. move 2 SPRITES at the same time

1. Go to https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/497868391/editor. Click on each of the “green” and “blue” Sprites to see the code that controls each of them.

2. Click on the green Flag above the Stage to run both sets of code at the same time. You should see this output.

3. Edit the code to create each of the patterns shown below.

a)

b)

4. Create your own patterns!

3. What dID YOU LEARN?

What did you learn so far?

How did you feel?

What else do you want to know?

REFERENCE VIDEOS

WHY MATH + CODING?

The affordances of modelling math with code (6 min.)